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We Are Here to Serve Everyone – Seek Health Care When You Need It

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The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center has been serving the Asian American community for more than 45 years. We want our patients and community members to know that they should not be afraid to visit their doctors. We will do our best to make sure that you have good health care, and care for you with respect and compassion.  We will never release your personal information unless we have your written approval or we are required to do so by law. Our staff is trained to keep your information private and confidential. We will not turn you away because you do not speak English, do not have a social security number, or do not have health insurance.

The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center is here to serve all New Yorkers regardless of your immigration history or ability to pay. We believe that health care is a basic right and everyone should receive care when they are in need.

Our health centers in Lower Manhattan and in Flushing, Queens are open seven days a week. Our doctors, nurses and staff care about you.  Many of them are immigrants or children of immigrants.  We speak Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese and will provide translation in other languages to make sure that we understand  your needs.  You have a right to interpretation at no cost to you.

There are other services in New York City to help you if you need health care.  These services are available to everyone:

  • Emergency room care.
  • Public and safety net hospitals (NYC HHC hospitals).
  • Public health services such as immunizations, mental health, screening and treatment for communicable diseases such as HIV, STD and tuberculosis.
  • Programs providing health services necessary to protect life and safety such as emergency medical, food or shelter, domestic violence, crime victim assistance, disaster relief.
  • Emergency Medicaid including labor and delivery for pregnancy.
  • Charity care at hospitals and sliding fee scale services at community health centers.
  • Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage for children and youth.

Many services do not cost a lot of money. To learn more, please call 311 which provides information about New York City government services.  You can also ask one of our social workers.  Our staff are available to answer any questions you have and help you find the services that meet your needs.

We want to help everyone in the community to live the healthiest life possible.

Learn more about the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center at http://www.cbwchc.org.


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Immigrants are America’s Past, Present, and Future

CYCWritten by Jane Eng, CEO

I grew up in an immigrant family.  My parents operated a hand laundry in Poughkeepsie, New York.  Sadly, my father passed away when I was in high school.  My mother was left with the responsibility to raise four children.  Despite the challenging circumstances, she made sure that all of her children went to college and beyond.  Today, my siblings and I are contributing members of our communities.

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Jane Eng’s brother in front of Eng’s Hand Laundry.

My family’s immigration history is not unique.  People from around the world have come to this country seeking freedoms and opportunities woven into the American dream.  The first generation works hard, and many make great sacrifices to secure a better future for their children.  In doing so, immigrants contribute to the rich diversity of cultures, backgrounds, skills and experiences that makes this nation great.

In New York City, immigrants have helped revitalize neighborhoods such as Coney Island, Jackson Heights, Flushing and Sunset Park, and account for about $250 billion of economic activity annually.  About 20% of Fortune 500 companies in the United States are founded by immigrants.  Many of these firms have a strong presence in this city.

Immigrants are also playing an important role in helping New York meet its healthcare workforce gaps.  One in three physicians in New York graduated from a foreign medical school, a sign that they were born outside the United States.

Immigrants are bringing vibrancy to the cultural life of this city through food, songs, dance, music, and other performing arts.  Their economic and cultural contributions have made New York a truly international city.

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Jane Eng with her mother and brother inside Eng’s Hand Laundry.

Today, I am proud to give back to immigrant communities by working at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center.  The Health Center provides high quality primary health care to all patients regardless of language, culture, age, disability, gender, sexual orientation, immigration history, or ability to pay.  More than 85% of our patients prefer to be served in a language other than English.  I truly believe that the Health Center’s success is due to our staff’s unwavering commitment to excellence and our ability to deliver linguistically accessible and culturally effective services.

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2016 Grand Opening of CBWCHC 45th Ave site in Flushing, Queens. CEO Jane Eng is 8th from left.

The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center has served a vital role in meeting the health care needs of Asian Americans and other immigrant communities for more than 45 years.  My hope is that we will continue to be a vital force in building healthy immigrant communities for many more decades to come.

Written by Jane T. Eng, Esq. Jane Eng is the chief executive officer of the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Jane has been involved with the Health Center since 1975. She is a board member of the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO) and Community Health Care Association of New York State (CHCANYS).


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Repeal of the Affordable Care Act and Impact on Our Patients

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The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center knows firsthand that this country has come a long way in in expanding health insurance coverage for millions of uninsured Americans. About 20 million Americans have gained health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) since it became law in 2010. Congress is now vowing to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which puts this advancement in danger if an appropriate replacement is not in place.

Lanying Lee was one of the first people we assisted to enroll for health insurance through the New York State of Health exchange in 2013. The exchange was set up by New York State to meet the requirements of Obamacare and help consumers shop for health insurance and apply for government subsidies.

Lanying is a petite Chinese woman who lives in Flushing, Queens with her small family. She had been a manicurist in New York City for ten years. Her husband owns a small shop that sharpens tools used in nail salons and does odd part-time work for added income. While their modest income made them ineligible for government funded health insurance, they did not earn enough to pay the high cost of private health insurance. “I read about Obamacare,” says Lee. “We were hearing a lot about it. I thought, ‘I need this.’”

According to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, two in ten Asian American residents of New York City were uninsured prior to the implementation of the New York State of Health initiative under the Affordable Care Act. For Lanying Lee, Obamacare could not have arrived soon enough. “We did not have health insurance for three years. We are getting older, and we want to take care of our health. We have specialist doctors to go to and general check-ups that we should have regularly. We were not going to the doctors because we could not pay. Having insurance has made such a difference for us. We are going to the doctors on schedule, and we are staying healthy. Obamacare is what we needed. It has been a bumpy ride to enroll, but it was worth it. We are very happy.”

Since the NY State of Health exchange was implemented, the percentage of uninsured New Yorkers was reduced by half. Having health insurance means that patients are able to maintain regular check-ups and preventative care, where they otherwise might forgo care or resort to going to an emergency room.  Many plans under the Obamacare provide free preventative care and well-woman visits, and reduced costs on prescription drugs.

On January 4th, 2017, NY Governor Cuomo stated his concern for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act without a replacement in place. The repeal of the Affordable Care Act may result in over 2.7 million New Yorkers losing their health coverage.  “Since its implementation, the Affordable Care Act has become a powerful tool to lower the cost of health insurance for local governments and New Yorkers, and it is essential that the federal government does not jeopardize the health and livelihoods of millions of working families,” Governor Cuomo said.

We believe that patients like Lanying Lee may suffer great harm if they lose their health insurance. We implore our members of congress to not repeal the Affordable Care Act without a replacement in place.

*Name of client has been changed

Read our thoughts on the Repeal of the Affordable Care Act and Impact on Community Health Centers


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How to Have a Happy Holiday Without Stress or Smoke

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Holidays are supposed to be an enjoyable time when family and friends gather together with food and drinks, but it can also be stressful as people rush from place to place. A cigarette can sound like the perfect way to de-stress, especially during a busy holiday season, but cessation coaches at the Asian Smokers’ Quitline have tips and encouragement for people attempting to quit, or want to stay quit through the season.

“Holidays are fun but they can also be stressful, so it’s important to be aware of triggers and to get extra support,” said Dr. Caroline Chen, project manager of the Asian Smokers’ Quitline. “Let family and friends know that you’re trying to quit, and ask for their support in helping you lead a healthier life.”

Here are some other general tips from cessation coaches on ways to avoid triggers and stay quit during the holidays:

  1. In the midst of holiday busyness, get adequate rest.
  2. Avoid spicy and sugary foods, and alcohol. Holidays are often all about the eating and feasting, but avoid foods that will make you crave cigarettes even more. Eat fruit or less sugary dessert on the menu. As for alcohol, put it away, and instead, reach for a sugar-free seltzer, club soda, or apple cider.
  3. If weather allows, go for a walk. To prevent taking up a new bad habit such as eating whatever you can find to avoid having a cigarette, stay active and exercise.
  4. Spend time with non-smokers. If all your friends are smokers, it may be time to make some new friends. Keep some distance from smokers, and create a community of people who are ex-smokers or non-smokers to help you keep busy and away from smoking.
  5. Having a supportive community is important on this journey. Call the Quitline! Call the Asian Smokers’ Quitline, a free nationwide telephone program for Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speakers who want to quit. When you call, a friendly staff person will offer various services: self-help materials, a referral list of other programs, one-on-one counseling over the phone, and a free two-week starter kit of nicotine patches.
  6. Lastly, don’t give up on quitting. You can do it!

About the Asian Smokers’ Quitline:

The Asia Smokers’ Quitline (ASQ) provides FREE, accessible, evidence-based smoking cessation services in Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean and Vietnamese to Asian communities in the U.S. ASQ has been shown to double their chances of quitting successfully. Services are provided by native speakers trained in smoking cessation. Eligible callers receive a free two-week starter kit of nicotine patches.

Health care providers and others in the community are encouraged to refer Asian language speaking smokers to ASQ. To learn more about referring, email asq@ucsd.edu or see the web referral link at www.asiansmokersquitline.org. Smokers can also call ASQ directly or enroll themselves online at www.asq-chinese.org, www.asq-korean.org, or www.asq-viet.org.

ASQ is funded by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and has served over 8,000 callers since it was established in 2012.

ASQ is open Monday through Friday, 7am to 9pm Pacific Time

Asian Smokers’ Quitline
1-800-838-8917 (Chinese)
1-800-556-5564 (Korean)
1-800-778-8440 (Vietnamese)

To learn more about ASQ (in English), visit: www.asiansmokersquitline.org.

At the Health Center, we can help patients quit or cut back on smoking.

Charles B. Wang Community Health Center
(212) 966-0461

This post was created by the Asian Smokers’ Quitline (ASQ) of University of California, San Diego


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Repeal of the Affordable Care Act and Impact on Community Health Centers

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The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center Executive Team would like to respond to concerns about the impact to community health centers and our patients if the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is repealed by the new Administration.

Federally qualified health center advocates believe that Congress and the newly elected president will end some key provisions of Obamacare.  However, how much is changed or undone is not clear.  Any plans to repeal and replace Obamacare will take time; it can take up to two years for Congress to agree to major changes and for the president to get a new program in place.

It is hard to predict exactly how the changes will impact primary health care and our communities. However, we do know that the community health center movement in this country is strong and growing.  Throughout the past five decades, federally qualified health centers have thrived and expanded under both Democratic and Republican administrations.  We remain optimistic that the progress that we have made in ensuring accessible, high quality health care for the people who need it most will endure.  Our staff understands our mission and is the reason why we are able to provide great care to all, regardless of ability to pay.

The repeal of Obamacare will mean that many individuals and families could lose their health insurance coverage.  Now, more than ever, federally qualified health centers must continue to expand our service capacity so that we can take care of more patients. With the support of our board of directors, the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center has been working hard to develop a new site in Flushing.  This expansion project will put us in a stronger position to meet the community’s current and future health care needs.

Today, as on every day, the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center affirms our mission by doing our best to meet our patients’ and community’s needs.  We have an outstanding staff, a committed board, and many collaborative partners.  In the coming months and years, we will work together to make sure that we continue to help the lives of our patients and improve the community’s health. We will work together with other New York City, New York State and national groups to support an inclusive health care system that protects all of our residents regardless of their language, culture, economics, or immigration status.

Executive Team – Jane Eng, Dr. Perry Pong, Betty Cheng, Regina Lee, Lynn Sherman, and Kenneth Shieh


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Smoking Cessation Medications

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Written by Michelle Chen

At the Health Center, we see many patients who believe willpower is the key to quitting smoking. However, it often takes more than motivation to quit successfully. When you smoke, your body becomes addicted to nicotine, a substance found in cigarettes and other tobacco products. Nicotine can make you feel good, but leaves you wanting more. You may feel irritable, anxious, or depressed when you do not smoke for a period of time. These withdrawal symptoms make quitting hard.

Fortunately, there are safe and effective medications to help you manage withdrawal symptoms. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is one of them. It gives you a small dose of nicotine without 7,000 of the toxic chemicals that the typical cigarette has. NRT is available as patches, gum, lozenges, an inhaler, and nasal spray. There are also pills (Zyban® and Chantix®) that you can take to fight discomfort and help you quit.

Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT)

Method Availability Description
Nicotine Patches Over-the-Counter The nicotine patch is placed on the skin and gives users a small and steady amount of nicotine.
Nicotine Gum Over-the-Counter Nicotine gum is chewed to release nicotine. The user chews the gum until it produces a tingling feeling, and then places it between their gums and cheek.
Nicotine Lozenges Over-the-Counter Nicotine lozenges look like hard candy and are placed in the mouth. The nicotine lozenge releases nicotine as it slowly dissolves in the mouth.
Nicotine Inhaler Prescription A nicotine inhaler is a cartridge attached to a mouthpiece. Inhaling through the mouthpiece gives the user a specific amount of nicotine.
Nicotine Nasal Spray Prescription Nicotine nasal spray is a pump bottle containing nicotine, which is put into the nose and sprayed.

Other Medications

Method Availability Description
Bupropion (Zyban®) Prescription Bupropion helps reduce nicotine withdrawal and the urge to smoke. Bupropion can be used safely in combination with NRT.
Varenicline (Chantix®) Prescription Varenicline helps to reduce nicotine withdrawal and the urge to smoke. It also blocks the effects of nicotine from cigarettes.

Speak to your doctor to learn if smoking cessation medication is right for you. Some smokers may need to use smoking cessation medication for 3 to 6 months before their withdrawal symptoms end. Most insurance companies will cover the cost of prescription drugs.

We know quitting can be hard, but your health improves the moment you stop. Just one day without smoking can lower your blood pressure and your risk for heart attack. Your loved ones will be thankful for it, too. Are you ready to take the next steps, but don’t know where to begin? Check out our posts for reasons to quit and more ways to handle cravings, and learn about secondhand smoke.

At the Health Center, we can help patients quit or cut back on smoking.

You can also get free patches and help from:

This article is made possible with funding from the RCHN Community Health Foundation. Medication information is from CDC.

Michelle Chen is a Health Educator at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. She has a B.A. in Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies from Barnard College. She is interested in the intersection of public health and Asian American activism.


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Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation – A Reflection on Minority Health

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Written by Rachelle Peraz Ocampo, EdM

This year, Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health celebrates its 30th year anniversary and launched the theme, “Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation” to observe National Minority Health Month. What does this mean for the Asian American community and our patients at Charles B. Wang Community Health Center? What does this mean to me?

The term “Health Equity” has been a trending phrase in the public health world, and it continues to dominate in spaces that align with advocating for social justice, addressing social determinants of health, and providing opportunities for the underserved. I first encountered the term “Health Equity” when I came across a simple, yet powerful image entitled “Equality Doesn’t Mean Justice.” It illustrates the stark difference between two often interchanged terms: equality and equity.

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These two images point out that equality is giving everyone the same resources, but this only works if everyone starts from the same place. Equity is providing access to the same resources or opportunities. At the Health Center, we believe that everyone should have the same opportunity to achieve their highest level of health. This means that we provide quality and comprehensive care to all members of our community no matter their ability to pay or their citizenship status. In the Health Education Department, we provide extra support to the populations we serve by developing and disseminating culturally and linguistically appropriate health resources. Our materials are shared through various online and print platforms, outreach and tabling events, coalition meetings, local businesses, educational workshops, and 1-1 counseling.

For me, “Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation” is about recognizing my personal areas of privilege. This includes the opportunity to earn degrees from higher education institutions through federally funded loans, having a strong and reassuring support system, and the opportunity to live in a safe home and neighborhood. By recognizing these areas of privilege, I proactively choose to raise awareness that systemic barriers exists and support underrepresented minority groups access and navigate resources that are culturally relevant and language appropriate. As we celebrate National Minority Health Month, it is imperative to acknowledge that there are severe gaps with providing equitable opportunities for minorities, particularly the Asian American community. The responsibility to bridge these gaps, as minorities, is on us.  These are some examples that I believe are how we can take part in the movement of health equity:

  • We need to develop more strategic partnerships with well-funded institutions, city agencies, and grassroots organizations that have aligned goals to serve minority populations.
  • We need to incorporate addressing minority health in all initiatives that drive socio-economic factors like affordable housing, job opportunities, and access to fresh and healthy food.
  • We need to create mentorship programs that focus on connecting minority students with other minority public health professionals.
  • We need to advocate for data disaggregation to provide improved funding streams, since different Asian American ethnicities have unique social, educational, and economic experiences and issues.

Supporting minority health can be as simple as retweeting a message that supports Health Equity for the Asian American community or can be as extensive as rallying groups to push Bill Intro 251 on data disaggregation. Each of us has a role to play for accelerating health equity, and I choose to be proactive in utilizing my extensive networks to raise awareness and provide tools and opportunities for our issues to be heard and addressed.

Rachelle Peraz Ocampo, EdM is the Associate Director of Health Education at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. She is also a Lead Co-Host of Makilala TV, the first Fil-Am TV Talk Show in the NY metro area and is on the Board of Directors for Roots Of Health which provides free clinical services and health education to women in the Philippines. Ever since her involvement with Pilipino American Unity for Progress, Inc. (UniPro), she has always been challenging herself to lead in spaces that help raise the Pilipino American voice. Follow Rachelle’s passions: @RockyRach16 @CBWCHC @MakilalaTV @ROHorg @UniProNow