Doctor's Notes


Leave a comment

What You Can Expect During a Breast Biopsy

GettyImages_460473969_man doctor woman patient

If your doctor finds a breast lump or sees a suspicious area in a mammogram or sonogram, he or she may recommend that you get a breast biopsy. You might wonder, what is a breast biopsy? Biopsy is an effective way to find out if the area is cancerous.

A breast biopsy removes a suspicious area in the breast, and cells are sent to a lab for testing. It may take more than a week to get results. There are three main types of biopsy: fine needle aspiration biopsy, core needle biopsy, and surgical biopsy. Your doctor will recommend the type of biopsy based on your situation.

During a fine needle aspiration biopsy, your doctor will use a thin needle to take out a sample of cells or fluid from the suspicious area. This biopsy can be done in a clinic.

Core needle biopsy is similar to the fine needle aspiration biopsy, but with a slightly larger needle. Your doctor may use X-ray equipment, ultrasound, or MRI to find the location of the suspicious area. This biopsy can be done in a clinic where you may have local anesthesia.

In a surgical biopsy, your doctor will remove part or all of the breast lump. This is usually done in a hospital where you will be put under local or general anesthesia.

What do the results mean? If the final results come back negative, this means the cells are not cancerous, but you may need early follow-up or intervention. If the results are inconclusive, you may need another biopsy. The results could come back positive, which means the cells are cancerous. Your doctor will help you determine the next steps based on the nature of the cancer cells.

It is important to understand the need to have a biopsy does not mean you have cancer. A biopsy sample is the most accurate way to diagnose cancer cells.

Talk to your doctor about any abnormal changes you have experienced and what preventive measures are suitable for you. You can make an appointment at our OB/GYN Department by calling (212) 966-0228 (Manhattan), (718) 886-1287 (37th Avenue, Queens) and (929) 362-3006 (45th Avenue, Queens). Learn more by visiting our OB/GYN webpage.


Leave a comment

We Are Here to Serve Everyone – Seek Health Care When You Need It

CBWCHC

The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center has been serving the Asian American community for more than 45 years. We want our patients and community members to know that they should not be afraid to visit their doctors. We will do our best to make sure that you have good health care, and care for you with respect and compassion.  We will never release your personal information unless we have your written approval or we are required to do so by law. Our staff is trained to keep your information private and confidential. We will not turn you away because you do not speak English, do not have a social security number, or do not have health insurance.

The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center is here to serve all New Yorkers regardless of your immigration history or ability to pay. We believe that health care is a basic right and everyone should receive care when they are in need.

Our health centers in Lower Manhattan and in Flushing, Queens are open seven days a week. Our doctors, nurses and staff care about you.  Many of them are immigrants or children of immigrants.  We speak Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese and will provide translation in other languages to make sure that we understand  your needs.  You have a right to interpretation at no cost to you.

There are other services in New York City to help you if you need health care.  These services are available to everyone:

  • Emergency room care.
  • Public and safety net hospitals (NYC HHC hospitals).
  • Public health services such as immunizations, mental health, screening and treatment for communicable diseases such as HIV, STD and tuberculosis.
  • Programs providing health services necessary to protect life and safety such as emergency medical, food or shelter, domestic violence, crime victim assistance, disaster relief.
  • Emergency Medicaid including labor and delivery for pregnancy.
  • Charity care at hospitals and sliding fee scale services at community health centers.
  • Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage for children and youth.

Many services do not cost a lot of money. To learn more, please call 311 which provides information about New York City government services.  You can also ask one of our social workers.  Our staff are available to answer any questions you have and help you find the services that meet your needs.

We want to help everyone in the community to live the healthiest life possible.

Learn more about the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center at http://www.cbwchc.org.


Leave a comment

Recycle the Old and Welcome the New – Happy Lunar New Year!

85446638

Written by Larissa Ho, GrowNYC Recycling Outreach Coordinator

Many Chinese families will begin sweeping the floors and clearing the house of old items a week before Lunar New Year. Known as, “年廿八,洗邋遢 ” or Spring Cleaning, this custom is symbolic for getting rid of bad luck that happened in the previous year, and making room for good luck in the New Year. While it is common and easy to put things in the trash bin, consider recycling and repurposing old items as you clean. Recycling not only protects the environment, but also transforms old items into new items, and reduces the amount of materials (trees, oil, etc.) needed to make those new things. Make Lunar New Year extra special by cleaning your home and your Earth in an eco-friendly way.

Here are seven common items that you can recycle and repurpose for the New Year:

Clothes and Jackets

Need more space in your closet? Consider donating your clothes and jackets to those in need of one. Organizations like Bowery Mission takes gently worn clothes (including socks and gloves) and coats for the homeless. You can also recycle your old clothes, bags, belts, and paired shoes by bringing them to certain GrowNYC Greenmarkets, which accept these items to be sorted for reuse or recycling. Usable clothes will be distributed to local and international second-hand markets while clothes not fit for reuse will be recycled as wiping rags or shredded and repurposed for insulation and other uses. By recycling unwanted clothes you help prevent sending unnecessary waste to landfills.

Electronics

If you have old phones lying around, take them back to any mobile service provider to recycle. They are required to accept cell phones at no cost. Other electronics (computers and TVs) can be dropped off at collection events organized by the Lower East Side Ecology Center.  Since e-waste is highly toxic to the environment, it is banned from curbside disposal.  Learn how to avoid fines and dispose of electronics responsibly at NYC Zero Waste.

Plastic Bags

Have mounds of plastic bags at home? You can save space by shopping with a reusable bag. Be mindful about your use of disposal plastic bags, which cannot be recycled at home. Clean plastic bags can be returned to large supermarkets and other select stores.

Toothbrushes, Brooms, and Mops

After all the cleaning, treat yourselves to new toothbrushes and cleaning tools! You can recycle the old ones in the metal, glass, and plastic recycling bin (usually blue bin or has blue label) if they are mainly plastic.

Party Utensils, Trays, and Plastic Food Containers

After the Lunar New Year potluck has finished, separate and recycle party utensils, trays and food containers! The majority of the items such as aluminum trays, aluminum foil, plastic utensils, and rigid plastic food containers go into the metal, glass, and plastic recycling bin (usually blue bin or has a blue label). Be sure to empty and rinse food containers before recycling.

Bottles and Cans

When you have finished with the celebratory drinks, recycle plastic bottles, glass bottles and cans in the metal, glass, and plastic recycling bin (usually blue bin or has blue label). Be sure to empty and rinse containers before recycling.

Red Envelopes, Calendars, and Lucky Signage

You can also recycle red envelopes, greeting signs and old calendars. Simply put them in the paper and cardboard bin (usually green bin or has green label). Other paper materials include magazines, wrapping paper, paper egg cartons, cardboard boxes and clean paper cups.

As a New Year is soon approaching, start fresh by tidying up in eco-friendly and responsible ways. Happy Cleaning and Happy Lunar New Year!

For more information on what you can recycle, type your item under “How to Get Rid Of…” section in the NYC Department of Sanitation website: http://www.nyc.gov/zerowaste

 

Larissa Ho is a Recycling Outreach Coordinator at GrowNYC, where she provides education and resources to NYC residents on how to recycle. She is passionate about sustainability and taking care of the environment. She formerly worked as a Teen Health Educator with the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center.

GrowNYC’s zero waste programs are funded by the NYC Department of Sanitation. 

grownyc-sanitation-lockup-final_021016

 


Leave a comment

How to Have a Happy Holiday Without Stress or Smoke

shutterstock_176410184

Holidays are supposed to be an enjoyable time when family and friends gather together with food and drinks, but it can also be stressful as people rush from place to place. A cigarette can sound like the perfect way to de-stress, especially during a busy holiday season, but cessation coaches at the Asian Smokers’ Quitline have tips and encouragement for people attempting to quit, or want to stay quit through the season.

“Holidays are fun but they can also be stressful, so it’s important to be aware of triggers and to get extra support,” said Dr. Caroline Chen, project manager of the Asian Smokers’ Quitline. “Let family and friends know that you’re trying to quit, and ask for their support in helping you lead a healthier life.”

Here are some other general tips from cessation coaches on ways to avoid triggers and stay quit during the holidays:

  1. In the midst of holiday busyness, get adequate rest.
  2. Avoid spicy and sugary foods, and alcohol. Holidays are often all about the eating and feasting, but avoid foods that will make you crave cigarettes even more. Eat fruit or less sugary dessert on the menu. As for alcohol, put it away, and instead, reach for a sugar-free seltzer, club soda, or apple cider.
  3. If weather allows, go for a walk. To prevent taking up a new bad habit such as eating whatever you can find to avoid having a cigarette, stay active and exercise.
  4. Spend time with non-smokers. If all your friends are smokers, it may be time to make some new friends. Keep some distance from smokers, and create a community of people who are ex-smokers or non-smokers to help you keep busy and away from smoking.
  5. Having a supportive community is important on this journey. Call the Quitline! Call the Asian Smokers’ Quitline, a free nationwide telephone program for Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speakers who want to quit. When you call, a friendly staff person will offer various services: self-help materials, a referral list of other programs, one-on-one counseling over the phone, and a free two-week starter kit of nicotine patches.
  6. Lastly, don’t give up on quitting. You can do it!

About the Asian Smokers’ Quitline:

The Asia Smokers’ Quitline (ASQ) provides FREE, accessible, evidence-based smoking cessation services in Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean and Vietnamese to Asian communities in the U.S. ASQ has been shown to double their chances of quitting successfully. Services are provided by native speakers trained in smoking cessation. Eligible callers receive a free two-week starter kit of nicotine patches.

Health care providers and others in the community are encouraged to refer Asian language speaking smokers to ASQ. To learn more about referring, email asq@ucsd.edu or see the web referral link at www.asiansmokersquitline.org. Smokers can also call ASQ directly or enroll themselves online at www.asq-chinese.org, www.asq-korean.org, or www.asq-viet.org.

ASQ is funded by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and has served over 8,000 callers since it was established in 2012.

ASQ is open Monday through Friday, 7am to 9pm Pacific Time

Asian Smokers’ Quitline
1-800-838-8917 (Chinese)
1-800-556-5564 (Korean)
1-800-778-8440 (Vietnamese)

To learn more about ASQ (in English), visit: www.asiansmokersquitline.org.

At the Health Center, we can help patients quit or cut back on smoking.

Charles B. Wang Community Health Center
(212) 966-0461

This post was created by the Asian Smokers’ Quitline (ASQ) of University of California, San Diego


Leave a comment

Celebrating Disability Pride

2

Written by Lilian Lin

Throughout July, we took part in celebrations that honored the 26th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. These events were especially meaningful to us because of our efforts to support families with children with special health care needs.  Spearheaded by the Health Center’s Pediatric Special Needs Team and generously funded by the family and friends of Mrs. Vicki Chang, the Special Needs Initiative is a comprehensive effort aimed to meet the multiple challenges faced by Chinese immigrant parents and caregivers of children with special needs. Through providing parent workshops, training programs, referrals to parent networks, and enhancing community collaboration, the Special Needs Initiative engages, empowers, and improves services for immigrant families with special needs children.

One of the major goals of this Initiative is to bring about systematic changes to address the complex barriers to care for children with special needs. To date, our Special Needs Team has built collaborative relationships with several community service agencies in Manhattan and Brooklyn that serve children with special needs and their families. Taking part in advocacy activities, such as the July Disability Pride Month events, has strengthened the voice of the disability community.

On July 10, 2016, the Pediatric Special Needs Team and two Health Center volunteers participated in the Festival of Fun and Fraternity which took place at Madison Square Park following the 2nd Annual New York City Disability Pride Parade.

1

The New York City Disability Pride Parade was started in July 2015 by Mike LeDonne, jazz pianist and Hammond organist, to promote inclusion, awareness, and visibility of people with disabilities, and to celebrate the anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), legislation that demands equal access and equal treatment of people with disabilities.

3

Our team set up a booth to distribute free educational materials about issues related to children and teenagers with special needs, as well as provided fun activities, such as bubble guns and temporary tattoos, to attract visitors of all ages. Our booth had a great turnout from individuals, families, and staff from agencies serving individuals with disabilities and their families.

306

On July 24, 2016, the Pediatric Special Needs Team and three Health Center volunteers participated in the Chinatown Weekend Walk Disability Pride ADA Birthday Party which took place in Chinatown on Mott Street (between Canal and Worth Streets). Many cultural organizations and local businesses joined together to celebrate the diverse disability community and the 26th anniversary of the ADA.

4

5

We appreciated joining this opportunity to raise awareness of the rights of people with disabilities and celebrate diversity among the Chinatown community.

Lilian Lin is the program coordinator of the Special Needs Initiative at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. She has an MPH in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She is passionate about working with people and supporting families.

 

 


Leave a comment

Let’s Talk About Colon Cancer

 

Eng

Written by Dr. Ady Oster

People do not talk about colon cancer very much.  Perhaps this is because it’s embarrassing to discuss, perhaps because they do not know much about it. That is a shame, because colon cancer is common and it is one of the most preventable cancers.

Colon cancer is the fourth most common cancer among Asian Americans, for both men and women (after breast, prostate, and lung) and (because it is more deadly than prostate cancer) colon cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths. While a few people with colon cancer have family members who also had colon cancer, most colon cancer occurs in people who do not have a family history of this cancer.

Cancers occur when a group cells grow out of control. Initially, they remain in one organ forming a lump. In time they can spread to other organs.  Most cancers are much more easily treated when they are still in one organ. Colon cancers start as a polyp. These are small, warty-looking bulges in the inside lining of the colon.  Over time, some of these polyps can become cancers (10% in ten years), invade the lining of the colon, and eventually spreading to other organs. Because polyps are small, they do not cause pain, diarrhea or constipation.  It is impossible to feel polyps.  The only way to know if you have a polyp is by having a doctor look at the inside of the colon.  If polyps are removed, they can no longer become cancer. Therefore, the best way to prevent colon cancer is to have a colonoscopy to look for and remove polyps.

Most polyps and cancers cause bleeding (not visible) into the stool. Usually it is too small to be visible, but it may be detectable with special stool tests. Another way to look for polyps or colon cancer is to have stool tested for microscopic blood. Older tests required eating a special diet for several days and collecting several stool samples. Newer tests do not require any special diet and only one stool sample. If any blood is found, a colonoscopy will be required to find the source of the blood and remove any polyps that are found.  If no blood is found, stool tests will need to be repeated every year in order to provide adequate reassurance that no polyps or cancers are in the colon.

During a colonoscopy, a doctor uses a long, flexible fiberoptic scope to examine the entire colon.  If any polyps are found, they are usually removed at that same time. Since polyps take several years to develop and will take even longer to become a cancer. People without any polyps can safely wait ten years between each colonoscopy. People who do have polyps will need to have colonoscopies more often, depending on how many and how big these polyps were. People are usually sedated for a colonoscopy, so most people do not remember having the procedure.  Unfortunately, in order for doctors to clearly see the lining of the colon, it must be cleaned of any stool. Therefore, people are asked to drink only clear liquid on the day or two prior to the test. On the evening before the test, they need to drink medicine that cleans the stool in the colon by causing diarrhea. This can be uncomfortable for a few hours.

The risk of cancer increases with age. Most people should begin testing for polyps or colon cancer at age 50.  People who have family members with colon cancer should talk to their healthcare provider about the right age to start.

Despite the embarrassment or discomfort, it is important to talk about colon cancer. Talk to your primary care doctor about whether colon cancer testing is appropriate for you.  Talk to your loved ones to make sure they have talked to their doctor about colon cancer. You can make an appointment to meet with a primary care provider here at Charles B. Wang Community Health Center by calling (212) 379-6998 for Manhattan, and (718) 362-3006 (37th Ave) or (929) 362-3006 (45th Ave) for Queens. For more information, visit the internal medicine webpage.

Written by Dr. Ady Oster. Dr. Oster is the section chief of internal medicine at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. He received his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and completed his residency training at Yale-New Haven Hospital and University of California at San Francisco. Dr. Oster is board-certified in internal medicine.


2 Comments

Man Up – Talk to Your Doctor About Sexual Health

Portrait of Mid Adult Man in Nanluoguxiang, Beijing

Written by Dr. Gail Bauchman

Women are more likely to see a doctor for regular check-ups than men, and yet it is so important that men have regular checkups to discuss all aspects of their health. Sexual health is one area that is incredibly important for men to understand. As a doctor at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center, here are a few aspects of sexual health that I discuss with male patients.

When you see your health care provider for a routine physical exam or to be screened for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), you will be asked some rather personal questions. These questions are important for your provider to better understand your health risks and provide the best possible treatment.  Some of the questions may involve your sexual practice. For instance, what are you doing to prevent pregnancy? What is your partner using to prevent pregnancy? How many partners have you had in the last year? Do you have sex with men, women or both? What do you do to protect yourself from sexually transmitted diseases and HIV?  Do you know how to use a condom appropriately?

Condom use offers protection against some sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection. They also offer some protection against pregnancy, but condoms along with the withdrawal method are considered to be the least effective methods to prevent pregnancy.  About 18 women out of 100 will get pregnant within the first year with condom use.

That is why it is important to know what your partner is using to prevent pregnancy. Your health care provider can help answer your questions about contraceptive methods for both you and your partner and help you decide on the most suitable methods. Learn more about birth control and family planning by reading this factsheet.

Question: if the condom breaks and your partner is not using an additional contraceptive method, do you know what to do next to protect her from getting pregnant? The answer is having your partner use emergency contraception.  One of the easiest options is if you or your partner buys a pill that does not require a prescription, called Plan B. The pill should be taken within 5 days of having unprotected sex, but the sooner it is taken the better. Plan B is not 100% effective, but does help reduce the chances of pregnancy.

Your provider may also ask you questions about whether you ever had any STIs. STIs can be transmitted through vaginal, anal, and oral sex and many of them do not cause symptoms, at least in the beginning.  If you do have symptoms such as urinary frequency, discharge from the penis or ulcers on the penis, seek out medical care to get treated. A urine sample is all that is required to test for the most common STIs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea. Without testing and treatment, you may unknowingly pass these infections on to your partner. Chlamydia and gonorrhea can cause a serious pelvic infection in women that may lead to infertility. Some STIs in pregnant women can also impair fetal development or be passed on to their babies during childbirth. Learn more about STI’s by reading this factsheet.

For the protection of yourself, your partner, and your child, we encourage all men to receive annual physical exams and be screened for STIs whenever they have a new partner.

Come visit us at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center to get your annual check-up and discuss these as well as other important health issues. Our OBGYN department offers family planning services and counseling to both men and women to help you improve your sexual health and achieve your reproductive life plan, whether you are seeking to have children or preventing pregnancy. You can make an appointment at our OBGYN department by calling (212) 966-0228 for Manhattan or (718) 886-1287 for Queens. Find more information by visiting our OBGYN webpage. You can also make an appointment to meet with a primary care provider by calling (212) 379-6998 for Manhattan, and (718) 362-3006 (37th Ave) or (929) 362-3006 (45th Ave) for Queens. Visit the internal medicine webpage.

Written by Dr. Gail Bauchman. Dr. Bauchman is a physician at the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center. She attended Stony Brook Medical School, and specialized in family medicine. She is board certified from the American Board of Family Medicine.